Best Car Insurance Companies of 2021

Reviews and ratings on the nation's leading Auto Insurance providers.
Get coverage, premium and discount information from our list of Top Car Insurance companies.

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The Car Insurance Guide makes the process and decision-making of car insurance more streamlined and efficient. To enable us to provide our content, we do sometimes collect revenue from our partners for consumers who visit their site from our site. We do not make any compensation for a consumer merely viewing our content. Although we sometimes adjust the ordering of which companies are profiled based on compensation we make a point of reviewing each company independently of any compensation that may or may not be received to ensure we preserve the value that consumers enjoy from visiting our site.

Best Car Insurance in

Logo for the Car Insurance Guide's Agent Survey – used to review and find the best companies of 2021

Welcome to The Car Insurance Guide:

Our goal is to help drivers make informed decisions -- because we believe that knowing is saving.

Saving drivers money? Yes. Saving drivers time by making it easy to compare all the best options in one place? Yes. Saving drivers from bad insurers – and the pain of poor claims-handling and customer service -- by providing and reviewing only the leading providers? Yes and yes. Basically, saving you from any costly guesswork.

With over 300 car insurance providers across the USA, truly finding the best one -- for your needs and your wallet -- is a daunting task. But it no longer has be. Introducing The Car Insurance Guide and our proprietary rankings of the best car insurance companies for drivers just like you in your state.

Our Methodology

How do we do it? First -- and utilizing decades of collective experience working with insurance companies -- our team spent over 600 hours researching carriers, analyzing policy data, and surveying independent agents. All this legwork allowed us to develop propriety rankings based on our ratings and reviews. The ratings are scored on a scale of 1 to 5 and based on several factors, including an insurer’s pricing, discount availability, handling of claims, and customer satisfaction.

Second, by leveraging our decades of collective experience working with and building insurance technology, we developed a proprietary algorithm. Ours mimics those of the insurers, but with one main difference: our algorithm benefits the driver instead of the insurance company.

Insurers can use their algorithms to get new or existing customers to pay higher and higher rates.

Rates are always changing -- based on complex factors, including a driver’s age, location, history, and much more -- and so is the type of driver an insurer needs at a given moment (often determined by these algorithms). And when prices fall, carriers are not required to lower your rate, especially if you are not the type of driver they currently need. Instead, our algorithm, based on your answers to a few simple questions, identifies providers looking for and offering the best prices, including discounts, for drivers just like you at this very moment.

Taken together, our proprietary ratings, reviews, and technology ranks not just the best car insurance companies, but the best ones for drivers like you. The first result you see wants to insure you the most, while those with the highest scores are rated best. Please read our full reviews to learn more about the companies that you are interested in or select view rates to compare providers.

How Much Coverage Do I Need?

The amount of coverage you need is ultimately your decision. To help you get to an answer, ask yourself two different questions:

  1. How much could I afford to pay out-of-pocket if I am at-fault in an accident?
  2. What is my budget for auto insurance?

Please keep in mind, if you are one of the roughly 15% of drivers who are uninsured, not having insurance can be much more costly than any premiums. Accidents happen. If you are at-fault, the other party will very likely sue you. This means that you could be on the hook for their medical expenses and any property damages. Even if you reside in one of the 12 no-fault states, or where insurers pay no matter who is at-fault, the other party’s insurance may not be enough to cover the injuries and damages. In such cases, you could still be sued for the remaining balance.

Also, in nearly every single state, it is illegal to drive without auto insurance. If caught, you could face fines, see your license get suspended, or even go to jail, especially if you caused the accident. For these reasons, it is highly recommended to purchase at the very least a policy that meets your state’s minimum insurance requirements, but ideally more, depending on your needs.

Liability Coverage:

Liability is the most basic type of coverage. In an accident, when you are at-fault, liability will provide coverage for the following:

  1. Bodily injury liability.

    Pays for the other party’s medical expenses, pain and suffering, and lost wages.
  2. Property damage liability.

    Pays for the damage done to the other party’s vehicle or other property.

State Minimum Insurance:

Each state has their own minimum amounts of liability coverage needed to meet the legal requirements of being insured. Note that some states do not require bodily injury, while others require personal injury protection or uninsured/underinsured coverage.

Below are the minimum liability limits for Alabama:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $25,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for Alaska:

  • Bodily injury: $50,000 max per person and $100,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $25,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for Arizona:

  • Bodily injury: $15,000 max per person and $30,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $10,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for Arkansas:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $25,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for California:

  • Bodily injury: $15,000 max per person and $30,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $5,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for Colorado:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $15,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for Connecticut:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $25,000 max per accident
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist bodily damage: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for Delaware:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $10,000 max per accident
  • Personal injury protection: $15,000 max per person and $30,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for the District of Columbia:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $10,000 max per accident
  • Uninsured motorist bodily damage: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Uninsured property damage: $5,000 max per accident with a $200 deductible

Below are the minimum liability limits for Florida, a no-fault state, where your own insurance covers the costs no matter who is at fault. However, if the injuries and medical expenses from an accident exceed certain thresholds, and if you are at-fault, you could still be sued and responsible to pay the balance above these limits out-of-pocket:

  • Bodily injury: not required but recommended
  • Property damage: $10,000 max per accident
  • Personal injury protection: $10,000 max per person

Below are the minimum liability limits for Georgia:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $25,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for Hawaii, a no-fault state, where your own insurance covers the costs no matter who is at fault. However, if the injuries and medical expenses from an accident exceed certain thresholds, and if you are at-fault, you could still be sued and responsible to pay the balance above these limits out-of-pocket:

  • Bodily injury: $20,000 max per person and $40,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $10,000 max per accident
  • Personal injury protection: $10,000 max per person

Below are the minimum liability limits for Idaho:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $15,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for Illinois:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $20,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for Indiana:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $25,000 max per accident
  • Uninsured motorist bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Uninsured property damage: $25,000 max per accident
  • Underinsured motorist bodily injury: $50,000 max per person

Below are the minimum liability limits for Iowa:

  • Bodily injury: $20,000 max per person and $40,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $15,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for Kansas, a no-fault state, where your own insurance covers the costs no matter who is at fault. However, if the injuries and medical expenses from an accident exceed certain thresholds, and if you are at-fault, you could still be sued and responsible to pay the balance above these limits out-of-pocket:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $25,000 max per accident
  • Personal injury protection: $4,500 per person for medical expenses; $900 per month for disability/loss of income; $4,500 for rehabilitation services; $25/day for in-home services; and $2,000 for funeral related
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for Kentucky, a no-fault state, where your own insurance covers the costs no matter who is at fault. However, if the injuries and medical expenses from an accident exceed certain thresholds, and if you are at-fault, you could still be sued and responsible to pay the balance above these limits out-of-pocket:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $25,000 max per accident
  • Alternatively, a combined single limit of $60,000

Below are the minimum liability limits for Louisiana:

  • Bodily injury: $15,000 max per person and $30,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $25,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for Maine:

  • Bodily injury: $50,000 max per person and $100,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $25,000 max per accident
  • Alternatively, a combined single limit of $125,000

Below are the minimum liability limits for Maryland:

  • Bodily injury: $30,000 max per person and $60,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $15,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for Massachusetts, a no-fault state, where your own insurance covers the costs no matter who is at fault. However, if the injuries and medical expenses from an accident exceed certain thresholds, and if you are at-fault, you could still be sued and responsible to pay the balance above these limits out-of-pocket:

  • Bodily injury: $20,000 max per person and $40,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $5,000 max per accident
  • Personal injury protection: $8,000 per person
  • Uninsured motorist bodily injury: $20,000 max per person and $40,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for Michigan, a no-fault state, where your own insurance covers the costs no matter who is at fault. However, if the injuries and medical expenses from an accident exceed certain thresholds, and if you are at-fault, you could still be sued and responsible to pay the balance above these limits out-of-pocket:

  • Bodily injury: $20,000 max per person and $40,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $10,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for Mississippi:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $25,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for Minnesota, a no-fault state, where your own insurance covers the costs no matter who is at fault. However, if the injuries and medical expenses from an accident exceed certain thresholds, and if you are at-fault, you could still be sued and responsible to pay the balance above these limits out-of-pocket:

  • Bodily injury: $30,000 max per person and $60,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $10,000 max per accident
  • Personal injury protection: $40,000 per person
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for Missouri:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $25,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for Montana:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $20,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for Nebraska:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $25,000 max per accident
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for Nevada:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $20,000 max per accident

Auto insurance is not mandatory in New Hampshire. However, if you are at-fault in an accident, you are required to cover the costs out-of-pocket. Below are the recommended minimum liability limits for New Hampshire:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $10,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for New Jersey, an optionally no-fault state, where your own insurance covers the costs no matter who is at fault. However, if the injuries and medical expenses from an accident exceed certain thresholds, and if you are at-fault, you could still be sued and responsible to pay the balance above these limits out-of-pocket:

  • Bodily injury: Not mandatory but recommended minimum of $15,000 max per person and $30,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $5,000 max per accident
  • Personal injury protection: $15,000 per person

Below are the minimum liability limits for New Mexico:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $10,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for New York, a no-fault state, where your own insurance covers the costs no matter who is at fault. However, if the injuries and medical expenses from an accident exceed certain thresholds, and if you are at-fault, you could still be sued and responsible to pay the balance above these limits out-of-pocket:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accidentfor injuries. $50,000 max per person and $100,000 max per accident for death
  • Property damage: $10,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for North Carolina:

  • Bodily injury: $30,000 max per person and $60,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $25,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for North Dakota, a no-fault state, where your own insurance covers the costs no matter who is at fault. However, if the injuries and medical expenses from an accident exceed certain thresholds, and if you are at-fault, you could still be sued and responsible to pay the balance above these limits out-of-pocket:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $25,000 max per accident
  • Personal injury protection: $30,000 per person
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for Ohio:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $25,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for Oklahoma:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $25,000 max per accident
  • Uninsured motorist bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for Oregon:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $20,000 max per accident
  • Personal injury protection: $15,000 per person
  • Uninsured motorist bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for Pennsylvania, a no-fault state, where your own insurance covers the costs no matter who is at fault. However, if the injuries and medical expenses from an accident exceed certain thresholds, and if you are at-fault, you could still be sued and responsible to pay the balance above these limits out-of-pocket:

  • Bodily injury: $15,000 max per person and $30,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $5,000 max per accident
  • Medical benefits: $5,000 max per person
  • Alternatively, a combined single limit of $35,000

Below are the minimum liability limits for Rhode Island:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $25,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for South Carolina:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $25,000 max per accident
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident with a $200 deductible. Underinsured is not mandatory
  • Uninsured/underinsured property damage: $25,000 max per accident. Underinsured is not mandatory

Below are the minimum liability limits for South Dakota:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $25,000 max per accident
  • Uninsured motorist bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for Tennessee:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $15,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for Texas:

  • Bodily injury: $30,000 max per person and $60,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $25,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for Utah, a no-fault state, where your own insurance covers the costs no matter who is at fault. However, if the injuries and medical expenses from an accident exceed certain thresholds, and if you are at-fault, you could still be sued and responsible to pay the balance above these limits out-of-pocket:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $65,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $15,000 max per accident
  • Personal injury protection: $3,000 per accident
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $65,000 max per accident is recommended but not mandatory

Below are the minimum liability limits for Vermont:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $10,000 max per accident
  • Uninsured motorist bodily injury: $50,000 max per person and $100,000 max per accident
  • Uninsured property damage: $10,000 max per accident with a $150 deductible

Below are the minimum liability limits for Virginia:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $20,000 max per accident
  • Uninsured motorist bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Uninsured property damage: $20,000 max per accident with a $200 deductible

Below are the minimum liability limits for Washington:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $10,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for West Virginia:

  • Bodily injury: $20,000 max per person and $40,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $10,000 max per accident
  • Uninsured motorist bodily injury: $20,000 max per person and $40,000 max per accident
  • Uninsured property damage: $10,00 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for Wisconsin:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $10,000 max per accident

Below are the minimum liability limits for Wyoming:

  • Bodily injury: $25,000 max per person and $50,000 max per accident
  • Property damage: $20,000 max per accident

Keep in mind, accidents cost on average $60,000 in bodily injury and about $10,000 in property damage. State minimums are usually enough to cover minor fender benders. However, in the event of more serious injuries, costs easily average in the low six figures. For this reason, consider purchasing bodily injury liability that is $100,000 per person and $300,000 per accident if possible.

Full Coverage Insurance:

Full coverage is not a type of insurance, but rather a term used to describe liability plus:

  1. Collision coverage.

    Pays to fix or replace your vehicle in the event of an accident, if you are at-fault, a victim of a hit-and-run, or hit by an uninsured driver.
  2. Comprehensive coverage.

    Pays to fix or replace your vehicle if it is stolen or damaged by non-accident causes, such as severe weather or vandalism.

Collision and comprehensive coverage are typically required if you lease or finance your vehicle. With these types of coverage, you must choose your deductible. A deductible is the amount you pay out-of-pocket when you file a claim or when you use the coverage. Deductible amounts are usually between $500 to $1,500 per claim. $1,000 is a very typical deductible choice.

Additional Insurance Coverage:

If your budget allows, and depending on your needs, consider these additional types of insurance:

  • Medical payments coverage.

    Will pay for additional medical expenses for you and your passengers after an accident, no matter who is at-fault.
  • Personal injury protection (PIP) coverage.

    Helps you pay for medical and additional expenses, such as childcare and lost income, while you recover from an accident. PIP is not offered in every state but is mandatory in no-fault ones.
  • Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage.

    Pays for expenses if you are hit by an uninsured driver. Also pays for expenses if you are hit by a driver who has low liability limits and is considered “underinsured.” This type is also required in some states.
  • Rental reimbursement coverage.

    Helps pay for a rental vehicle while yours is being repaired. Daily limits can vary by provider and policy.

How Can I Get the Lowest Rates?

Unlike with buying a car, you cannot haggle with a salesman to get a lower rate on auto insurance. Instead, getting the best price really boils down to comparing as many providers as you can, along with knowing your discounts, and following a few tips with respect to coverage.

  1. Know how to shop around:

    This may seem obvious, but we cannot stress how important it is to compare multiple quotes. It is a good idea to do this regularly, perhaps every quarter or every time your policy is up for renewal. Also, try to keep comparisons “apples-to-apples,” making sure you are getting quotes for the same coverage across providers. If you already have a policy, keep your insurance declaration page within reach so you can reference your current coverage. If you are not currently insured, and do not know how much coverage you need, you can start by comparing state minimum insurance, and optionally add on coverage to your quote from there.

    Keep in mind that rates are always changing, and insurers are not obligated to drop the premiums of your current policy when prices fall. The Car Insurance Guide makes it easy to shop around and find cheap auto insurance. Our rankings are built upon proprietary ratings, reviews, and technology. Based on your answers, we personalize the results and show you the best providers offering the best prices to drivers just like you.

  2. Know your discounts:

    Just because you are eligible for a given discount does not always mean you will be offered one. The Car Insurance Guide checks discount availability by provider. It is also recommended to confirm all discounts during the insurer’s quoting process. Discounts do vary by carrier, but can include and average as follows:
    • Vehicle discounts:

      • Safety feature discount (anti-lock brakes, airbags, daytime running lights):
        5% to 10%
      • Electric/hybrid vehicle discount:
        10%
      • Newer vehicle discount (less than 3 years old):
        10% to 15%
      • Anti-theft system discount:
        5% to 25%
      • Multi-vehicle policy discount:
        10% to 25%
    • Driver discounts:

      • Paperless billing discount:
        3%
      • Pay up front:
        5% to 10%
      • Safe driver discount :
        5% to 10%
      • Low mileage discount (typically under 12,000 miles/year):
        5% to 10%
      • Homeowner discount :
        5% to 15%
      • Military discount :
        15%
      • Switch and save discount (must be currently insured):
        10% to 20%
      • Bundle home and auto discount:
        20%
      • Good student discount:
        15% to 25%
  3. Know your coverage:

    As previously discussed, deciding on how much coverage you think you need is very important. Obviously, all things equal, a liability-only policy will be much cheaper than a full coverage one. When selecting coverage, consider the following:
    • Skip collision or comprehensive coverage if your car is old.

      If the Blue Book value of your car is low, there is likely little reason to pay insurance for repairs or a replacement it if it is damaged by you in an accident or by a non-accident cause. Skipping will lower your monthly premiums.
    • Raise your deductibles.

      If you are leasing or financing your car, or if it is newer and worth more, then you probably should not skip collision or comprehensive coverage. However, if you can afford paying more out-of-pocket when you need to use this coverage, such as when taking your car to an auto body shop, consider getting a deductible that is $1,000 or more. Raising your deductible will lower your monthly rates.
    • Sell or donate that extra car no one drives anymore.

      Why insure something that you barely use? Consider how often you or someone in your household drives that back-up vehicle. In place of those rare instances where someone needed it, occasionally taking a rideshare or public transportation is likely cheaper.
    • Pay-per-mile or telematics coverage.

      Several insurers are now offering coverage based on how much you drive (known as pay-per-mile) or even how well you drive (known as telematics). If you do not drive far, or only drive occasionally, consider pay-per-mile coverage, because you only pay when you drive. Notable pay-per-mile insurers include Esurance and Metromile, but availability varies by state.

      Certain carriers offer to monitor your driving behavior in exchange for lower rates. They provide what is known as a telematics device, which basically plugs into your car’s diagnostics port, or their mobile app has a telematics feature. If you are a safe driver and seldom slam on the brakes or speed, then you can get lower rates with this type of coverage. Most notable telematics insurers are Progressive and Allstate, but availability varies by state.

Car Insurance Company Ratings & Reviews

The Car Insurance Guide powers our proprietary rankings through several methods. One of the most crucial has proven to be our industry-leading Agent Survey, where we interviewed agent after agent to truly understand which providers are the best and why.

Agents -- especially those who are experienced, passionate about helping clients, and independent or not bound to any one insurer -- have a deep understanding of what drivers need and what insurers want. Working day in and day out within both sides of this coin means that agents can truly be the experts in this industry.

We were fortunate enough to survey many such experts who readily know which companies work-out best for which drivers. Keep in mind that agents are often incentivized to not only sign up new drivers, but to retain them. And the easiest way to retain a policy is to get drivers the best company from day one. Note that in order to keep them honest, we incentivized the surveyed agents only for information.

The surveys and interviews revealed a lot of insights, and two things were always clear: no two providers are the same and certain carriers would regularly come up as the leaders in certain categories. For these reasons, we rated the best providers (on a scale of 1 to 5) for the following categories:

Our Agent Survey was also the basis of our reviews. We summarized and highlighted the key benefits of those carriers and brokers who scored a rating of 3.0 or better. Note that use of our 2021 car insurance reviews by third parties without the express written consent of The Car Insurance Guide is strictly prohibited.

10 Best Car Insurance Carriers of 2021

Below are the top 10 car insurance carriers of 2021. The rankings are an aggregate score and are not based on a single, specific type of driver. In other words, depending on your needs, the best one may be different for you, which is why we recommend you enter your zip code to start personalizing your results. That said, based on our research, the below companies proved to be best overall. Click the carriers you are interested in to read our full reviews:

  1. Travelers
  2. Liberty Mutual
  3. Allstate
  4. Progressive
  5. Metromile
  6. Root Insurance
  7. Esurance
  8. Mercury
  9. Clearcover
  10. Direct Auto

5 Best Car Insurance Brokers of 2021

Here are the top 5 car insurance brokers of 2021. They are ranked based on an aggregate score, which is not reflective of a single, specific type of driver. In other words, depending on your needs, the best one may be different for you, and that is why we recommend entering your zip code to start personalizing your results. That said, based on our research, the below brokers proved to be best overall. Select the brokers you are interested in to read our full reviews:

  1. Clutch Insurance
  2. The Zebra
  3. Insurify
  4. Compare
  5. Best Auto Insurance